kamagra 100mg oral jelly sildenafil

Safety Changes for Surgeons

By on May 19, 2013

Most surgeons-in-training dislike new rules that limit how many hours they can work, according to a new study that also found the majority said they skirt the restrictions. Researchers surveyed 1,013 surgical residents – who train for years alongside more senior surgeons – and found that about two of every three said they disapproved of the 2011 regulations, which aimed to improve patient care as well as the residents’ education and quality of life.

“I don’t think anybody wants to work 120 hours a week, but I don’t think we really want medicine to necessarily have bankers’ hours,” said Dr. Brian Drolet, the study’s lead author and a fourth-year surgical resident at Rhode Island Hospital in Providence.

Under pressure from the public and government officials, in July 2011 the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) restricted the shifts of the most junior trainee surgeons, first-year surgical interns, to 16 hours and capped the shifts of the remaining residents at 28 hours.

The regulations built on similar restrictions the organization put in place in 2003, but the policy has raised questions about whether simply restricting the hours doctors-in-training are permitted to work improves their lives or the health of their patients. For the new study, Drolet and his colleagues surveyed residents from graduate programs across the U.S. at the end of 2011, six months after the regulations went into effect. Of the 4,140 residents sent the survey, about a quarter answered the 20 questions about patient care and residents’ education and quality of life.

More than half said that patient safety was unchanged six months after the regulations were put in place. About 40 percent said patient care got worse, however, and about 10 percent said it improved.

As for their own education, about 40 percent of residents said there was no decrease in quality, but another 55 percent said it had gotten worse. About 70 percent also said there was less focus on preparing them to take on a more senior role. The same proportion also felt senior residents had to take on tasks more suited for a less-experienced resident.

About half of the residents said their work schedules were worse after the change and about 22 percent said they were getting less rest despite the limits on work hours.

One Comment

  1. telefonsex oma

    January 22, 2015 at 6:50 am

    935985 760884Sweet website , super layout, really clean and utilize genial . 887043

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *