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Aspirin Use for Heart Health

By on July 21, 2013
aspirin

Attention! Now is the time to make your voice heard on a federally funded research plan on aspirin and cardiovascular disease. The proposed research could influence the standard for preventive care for the future. This draft Research Plan is available for comment from July 11 until August 7, 2013 at 5:00 p.m., ET.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has commissioned this systematic review in order to update its 2009 recommendation on the targeted use of aspirin for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

A separate systematic review has been commissioned to update the USPSTF’s 2007 recommendation on the use of aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for the prevention of colorectal cancer; the draft Research Plan was posted for public comment on the USPSTF Web site from June 13 to July 10, 2013. A third systematic review has been commissioned to assess the risks and benefits of the use of aspirin for the prevention of all types of cancer; the draft Research Plan will be available in the near future.  Together, these three systematic reviews will allow the USPSTF to simultaneously consider all three bodies of evidence.

Proposed Key Questions to Be Systematically Reviewed

  1. Does regular aspirin use in persons without known cardiovascular disease reduce myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, death from MI or stroke, or all-cause mortality?
    1. Does the effect of aspirin vary by subgroup characteristics, such as age, sex, smoking status, race/ethnicity, 10-year cardiovascular risk, or related risk conditions (e.g., diabetes mellitus, decreased ankle brachial index, or elevated blood pressure)?
    2. Does the effect of aspirin vary by dose, formulation (enteric coated), or duration of use?
  2. Does regular aspirin use increase gastrointestinal bleeding, hemorrhagic stroke, or other serious harms (e.g., age-related macular degeneration)?
    1. Does the effect of aspirin vary by subgroup characteristics, such as age, sex, smoking status, race/ethnicity, 10-year cardiovascular risk, related risk conditions (e.g., diabetes mellitus, decreased ankle brachial index, or elevated blood pressure), gastrointestinal bleeding or hemorrhagic stroke risk factors (including history of gastrointestinal bleeding, ulcers, or NSAID use), or concomitant medication use (NSAIDs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or proton pump inhibitors)?
    2. Does the effect of aspirin vary by dose, formulation, or duration of use?

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