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Advancing Health Equity

By on July 12, 2014

The health status of racial and ethnic minority men has lagged far too long behind the general population, despite our nation’s vast advances in science, public health and health care. Reducing health disparities and achieving health equity so that everyone has the opportunity to reach their full potential for health is a priority of the Administration. An important factor in making progress toward this priority is our ability to understand why disparities occur and how to eliminate them.

A new data brief by the Office of Minority Health, examining the characteristics of uninsured adult males by race and ethnicity, is a useful tool to inform federal, state and community efforts aimed at improving insurance coverage of targeted populations. This type of data will enhance our ability to better measure and track health differences of racial and ethnic minority populations in the future.

Using data from the 2012 American Community Survey (ACS), an annual ongoing survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau, the data brief highlights several factors that impact health and access to health care for minority men.

Examples of key findings include:

  • Nearly 2 out of 5 African-American and Latino adult males less than 35 years old were uninsured.
  • A majority of uninsured adult males across all racial and ethnic groups have a high school diploma.
  • A high proportion of uninsured adult males across all racial and ethnic groups reported family incomes at or below 100 percent of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL).
  • A majority of uninsured adult males across all racial and ethnic groups report having a full-time worker in the household.
  • African American males reported the highest proportion (60 percent) of respondents with family income at or below 100 percent of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL).
  • Twenty-eight percent of uninsured adult Asian and 24 percent of uninsured adult Latino males reside in a limited English proficient household.
  • A lower percentage of uninsured Latino (6 percent) and Asian (5 percent) males reported experiencing a disability compared to 12 percent of White and 11 percent of African American uninsured males.

 

NadineGracia

 

J. Nadine Gracia, MD, MSCE, is the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health and the Director of the Office of Minority Health at the US Department of Health and Human Services. The Office of Minority Health is dedicated to improving the health of racial and ethnic minority populations through the development of health policies and programs that will help eliminate health disparities.

The content for this article is from the Office of Minority Health.